The Glomesh Story

There was a time when every style-conscious woman in Australia carried a Glomesh wallet. Symbolic of taste, affluence and a fashionable disposition, there are few national brands with such a recognisable aesthetic. The unmistakable glimmer of Glomesh remains a mark of pure glamour for any wearer.

1950s

In 1956, Hungarian immigrants Alice and Louis Kennedy arrived in Sydney, bringing their experience from the European couture scene. Starting a factory in Bondi, the first Glomesh product rolled off the line in 1958. The eye-catching gold, silver and enamel wares dazzled high society’s fashion elite. The original Pesh wallet was a best-seller, named after the Hungarian pronunciation of Budapest as ‘Budapesht’. Alice was the model for the first ever export catalogue and continued to be the face of the brand.

1960s

Glomesh extended its range to feature cigarette cases, atomisers, mirrored compacts, lipstick holders, lighters and glasses cases. Alice and Louis became darlings of Australia’s high fashion crowd and popular socialites at the epicentre of the ostentatious 1960s party scene. Lavish affairs at their impressive modern home in Bellevue Hill would entertain the who’s who of Sydney’s most prominent influencers. Alice was celebrated for her kindness and fun sense of humour. Louis, a natural salesman, was as charismatic as she was beautiful.

1970s

The glittery, mirror ball aesthetic of the 70s furthered the brand’s appeal. The disco decade also gave way to more fluid and draped forms. The slouch bag and halter tops were introduced along with neckerchiefs, earrings and belts. Glomesh was also being seen in the company of some of Australia’s most famous and fabulous women. The What’s in your bag? advertising campaign featured actresses Jacki Weaver, Delvene Delaney and Paula Duncan, Miss World Belinda Green and designers Jenny Kee and Carla Zampatti.

1980s

Glomesh had become the most recognised accessory on the Australian fashion scene. It was now enmeshed in the fabric of Australia’s fashion history. Consequently, this decade saw the brand modelled on the most famous body both here and around the world, Elle MacPherson. For unknown reasons, the new owners and producers of Glomesh at the time stopped producing pieces and the brand became dormant. As purchased goods lay quietly in cupboards and dressers across the country for two decades, they were secretly gaining cult status.

2000s

It was this decade when the world farewelled Alice and Louis Kennedy, with his passing in 2008 and hers in 2010. As their friends and family remembered them, they also shared fabulous stories of the brand’s phenomenal success. Simultaneously, an organic revival started taking place on the streets. Young women began rummaging through their grandmother’s wardrobes and descending on op shops to source original bags, wallets and clutches, paring them back with razored denim and band t-shirts. The world’s obsession with vintage was taking off, and Glomesh was suddenly a sought-after collectable.

Today

In 2014, Daniel Goldberg, officially relaunched Glomesh. The resurrection of his grandparents’ legacy was as much a professional venture as a personal one. While he and the family hold the brand close to heart, he is objectively aware of its iconic reputation. Today, the range echoes classic designs but is of superior quality to suit modern lifestyles. The Pesh wallet continues to be a favourite while the Miriam and Renee bags maintain staple status in the collection.